Archive for the ‘Upstart’ Category

Why We’re Ditching Strategy – And Taking Up Business Hacking

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

We Say: “Our Upstart programme trashes traditional growth planning and uses an agile model for business planning.”

We’ve had enough.

No, really. It’s 2016. We’ve all seen how value is now being created outside of traditional industrial structures in high-growth companies using business models which are enabled by digital.

But theUpstart LOGO 0 01 copy process of planning for this growth hasn’t moved on.

If you’re taking iron ore and creating steel, or finished product such as cars, yes you need a strategic five year plan. Capacity and resources are all planned on an industrial scale. But what happens in the post industrial age when you want to scale up a digital product or service? Upstart Strategy Dead

Models such as Uber and Airb’n’b rely on extracting meaning from data, not extracting raw materials from the ground.

Planning in the knowledge economy is uncertain at best and at worst impossible. When you have no proof that the market even needs your product before it’s been conceived, you shouldn’t ever be planning in a traditional business planning way.

And when success does come, there’s little or nothing in the management textbooks about how to handle that exponential growth which digital services see when they hit the sweet spot of product / market fit.

So what to do?

Where does the start-up or scale-up business leader go for tools and frameworks?

Through our experience, we’ve learned from growth stage companies who are creating services rapidly. We implicitly understand their agility and ability to iterate and pivot quickly.

We see them applying the Build > Measure > Learn cycle to create services in a short space of time. And we’ve found that you can use the same approach for creating and iterating your strategy.

And that’s what Upstart is about.Product_Strategies

Working with small companies in different areas we’ve evolved a model which turns traditional strategy consulting on its head. Fundamental to this approach is breaking down the business of strategy into individual problems. And then solving them. One by one.

We believe this change in approach is as revolutionary to the development of high-growth companies as the application of agile tools has been to product development.

In coming weeks we’ll be sharing how we use low-cost and no-cost tools and techniques to create and reveal value. And how Lean Startup author Eric Ries views our approach.